Aston Martin DBR22 To Feature 3D Printed Rear Subframe

Aston Martin has unveiled its spectacular DBR22: A V12-engined two-seater coach-built design concept, celebrating the marque’s extraordinary bloodline of open-cockpit sports racers.

The creation of the DBR22 design concept is the latest in a long line of projects expertly handled by in-house bespoke division, Q by Aston Martin, which this year celebrates a decade of building exclusive cars for the world’s most discerning customers. Iconic one-off commissions such as Aston Martin Victor, and low volume specials such as Vulcan – limited to 24 examples worldwide, and Vantage V600 – limited to just 14, are truly magnificent examples of these collaborations. It seems only fitting then, that the DBR22 design concept should also form the basis of a production reality example for an ultra-exclusive number of Q by Aston Martin customers.

With classic proportions and immaculate, muscular curves, DBR22 unashamedly speaks of tradition – specifically Aston Martin’s lifelong lineage of world-beating two-seater open-cockpit sportscars such as the DBR1 and DB3S – but expresses it with a dynamic new take on this compelling theme.

The DBR22 features a 3D printed rear subframe – the first time Aston Martin has introduced such a method. The component is made from multiple 3D printed parts printed from aluminium, which are then bonded to form the finished subframe. The advantages offered include a significant weight saving with no reduction in stiffness, plus the ability to make special parts for ultra-low volume models, where required.

Roberto Fedeli, Aston Martin Chief Technical Officer, said “Technology is pivotal in the construction of DBR22, with extensive use of carbon fibre throughout, and the use of 3D printing for the manufacture of a structural component. As such DBR22 showcases Aston Martin’s unique capabilities, with world-class design combined with an agile, intelligent approach to engineering and production. For a car that was designed to celebrate the ultimate bespoke customisation service, the engineering developments mean DBR22 truly has the dynamic theatre to match, ensuring the drive is just as addictive as its looks.”

The Additively Manufactured subframe has been manufactured by automotive supplier Divergent Technologies who harnesses its Divergent Adaptive Production System (DAPS) to manufacture 3D printed parts. Aston Martin is understood to be the first named automotive brand to receive 3D printed components from Divergent.

The Divergent DAPS system is a complete software hardware solution designed to replace traditional vehicle manufacturing. To make the complex simple, it is a complete modular digital factory for complex structures. Given a set of digital requirements as input, the machine automatically computationally engineers, additively manufactures,  and assembles any complex structure.  The system is able to move seamlessly between manufacturing different vehicle models.

In April 2022 Divergent raised $160 million with the funding intended to increase its manufacturing capacity and open new factories in the United States and Europe from 2024.

For more information: www.astonmartin.com

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